Tuesday, September 18, 2012

A Tale of Two Cities

A typical homestead in Naigobya, compared to...
Today I sit in Jinja, second largest city in Uganda.  OK, that sounds more impressive than it really is, as Jinja is all of 100,000 people.  Still, there are a fair amount of pedestrians, taxis, bicycles, motorcycles, potholes, and pollution to navigate through just to go to the bank or the grocery store.  But then, at least there is a bank and a grocery store.  That's more than can be said for the tiny village of Naigobya, nestled "deep in the village," as they say, the African equivalent to being "out in the boondocks."   On our first visit, I thought we were headed to the ends of the earth (but I knew it wasn't because I had already been there when we lived in Tanzania).  What a contrast it provided to the hustle and bustle of Jinja and Kampala, two cities in Uganda where we have spent a fair amount of time.  At our home in Naigobya we have no water sources except rain (which we collect in a large tank) and a nearby well used by the entire community.  We don't have electricity, except for a couple solar panels, a battery, some 12v lighting, and a small inverter so we can charge our phones, which really don't work out there anyway, so why bother.  But it is quickly becoming home, since we didn't go there because of the posh accommodations.  We went there because the place is full of broken lives (not so unlike us) that need healing.  I think we can help with that, not because we are anything special, but because we have Jesus to offer, which means we have hope to offer, not just for today, but for tomorrow and for eternity.


...a typical home of a wealthy person in Jinja;

You have your own tale of two cities to tell, don't you?  The contrast between wherever you live and Naigobya is indeed extreme.  What can you do to help bring hope to the hopeless?  Lots.  But it begins with a realization that your chief goal in life cannot be to please yourself, but instead must be to bring glory to God.  Once you realize this, you'd be surprised at how much smaller your problems become, and how much bigger the needs of others become.  You might even think you are called to save the world, but don't make that mistake.  You are only called to serve him in whatever way he sees fit.  Maybe you would like to serve by partnering with us, not to save Naigobya, but simply to follow God into the homes of the broken.  We'd love it if you decided to do that.  It's a bumpy road at times, but always worth the trip.   





St. Paul Church in Naigobya, compared to the...

...ornate Bugembe Cathedral near Jinja;



The sleepy village of Naigobya, compared to the...

...Bustling downtown of Jinja.

2 comments:

  1. Thanks for the photos of both Jinja and Naigobya -- they're very helpful to give us a feel of where you live, work and minister! Blessings!

    ReplyDelete
  2. "A picture is worth a thousand words." That is so true. Praying God's blessing over The Afayo Project and over your lives as you live & breathe Jesus to those you meet.

    ReplyDelete